Blood Orange Sour

This one started a while back.  I wanted to somewhat clone Crooked Stave’s St. Bretta but add in Blood Oranges.  I am pretty sure their Summer variant of this beer is made with Blood Oranges, but I never had the pleasure of drinking it.  So I went with a recipe pulled from the May/June 2012 Zymurgy magazine where Chad talks about brewing with 100% brett.  Their is a recipe for a 100% Brett Belgian White, which is kind of the base beer for St. Bretta which originally got it’s name from his WWB series WWBO (Orange).  WWBO is a wheat forward beer, 100% brett fermented with oranges added.  I believe everything about the orange is added, the zest, skin, pulp and juice.

So I wanted to take think idea and run with it and see what the results where.  This was 8 months ago….. So I took several dregs from Crooked Stave bottles and made a good healthy starter.  The 1st 2 weeks of fermentation were normal, big huge krausen no brett funk aroma, just a normal fermentation.  Then things started dying down and finally fermentation was complete.  I checked the gravity and it was still way too high, around (1.030).  So after a few more days a pellicle started to form, and then after a few weeks it turned into the picture you see below.

blood orange pellicle

So since I could not get Blood Oranges at the time of brewing I opted for 100% Blood Orange juice to add at the end of the boil.  I zested 4 Minneola Tangelos and added them in at flame out.  The grist is made up of mainly Pale and Wheat malts, with some Munich, Acid Malt, Golden Naked Oats and Flaked Barley.  Anyway once the pellicle had taken hold and then mostly dropped out I took a sample gravity which was still really high and no where near where I would have liked it (1.026).  I then took a PH reading and it read 3.1, which would explain why everything seemed to stop fermenting.  In a really heavy acid solution, nothing is going to work correctly.  I have spent several months trying to figure out what to do about this.  Blending comes to mind, but that requires extra work and extra brewing with extra beer left over.  I added in 2 packets of Champagne yeast and still nothing is fermenting.  Forward to spring 2014 and I run across some Blood Oranges in Whole Foods so I figure I would try one last thing before brewing another batch to blend.  I peeled and cut up the 4 lbs of Blood Oranges added them to a new sanitized fermenter and then racked the beer over to the pulp of the oranges.  I then added in a good dose of ECY Bug County (ECY20), now it’s finally showing signs of life again.  It’s another wait and see beer that I hope pans out, because the aroma on this beer is fabulous.

On to the recipe:

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
6 gal 90 min 21.2 IBUs 6.0 SRM 1.058 SG 1.015 SG 5.7 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
Witbier 16 A 1.044 - 1.052 1.008 - 1.012 10 - 20 2 - 4 2.4 - 2.9 4.5 - 5.5 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pale Malt (2 Row) UK 7.25 lbs 51.77
Wheat - White Malt (Briess) 2.254 lbs 16.1
Acidulated (Weyermann) 1.5 lbs 10.71
Munich Malt 1.5 lbs 10.71
Barley, Flaked (Briess) 0.75 lbs 5.36
Oats, Golden Naked (Simpsons) 0.75 lbs 5.36

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Mt. Hood 0.75 oz 60 min First Wort Pellet 6
Northern Brewer 0.5 oz 10 min Boil Pellet 8.5
Northern Brewer 0.5 oz 0 min Dry Hop Pellet 8.5

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Orange Peel, Bitter 0.25 oz 20 min Boil Spice
Coriander Seed 0.20 oz 20 min Boil Spice

Notes

Add in zest of 4 Minneola Tangelo's at Flame Out. Added 16oz of Blood Orange Juice from the bottle. Added in a starter mixture of Crooked Stave dregs.

Gravity down to 1.026 with a PH of 3.1

Added 4 lbs of Blood Oranges to beer.
Added in ECY BugCountry yeast and it's starting to ferment again.

Hibiscus Gose

I am infatuated with Westbrook’s Gose (pronounced Goes-a).  Comes in 6 pack cans and is available for a majority of the Spring/Summer/Fall, its 4% alcohol and it’s the definition of salinity and soury goodness.  It’s very refreshing and there is just enough salt to help wash things away, but it has an endearing quality of making you wanting more.  I usually can down a 6 pack pretty quickly and not feel  any effects from the alcohol.  Of course this might have to do that I am basically a minimalist drunk, but who knows right?

Anyway my first introduction to Gose was though the Mad Fermentationist’s blog post about Gose back in 2010, since then it’s really come back as a style, so much so that I believe that the BJCP’s next style releases will include a Gose style category.  So I have really been wanting to make one for some time.  I had a chance to come up with a quick recipe a few weeks back hoping for a quick turn around and an easy drinking beer ready for the hotter days coming up soon.  Sadly fermentation stopped at around 1.020 and I couldn’t get it started again (more on this later).  I wanted something fairly salty and somewhat sour with some Hibiscus.  So I opted for the Acid malt way of souring this beer so I wouldn’t have to endure a lacto fermentation and mess up another better bottle.

So after some research I found that adding a certain amount of acid malt in a secondary mash would effectively drop my PH low enough where it would be considered “sour” without having to use any type of bugs or bacteria.  So I decided on 3 lbs of Acid malt crushed and thrown into the mash before my 1st sparge.  I left the mash sitting for a good hour and checked the PH of the mash.  The temp was holding around 145F and the PH was reading around 4.2.  I was shooting for 4.1 so I left it for 30 more minutes.  Once the mash reached a PH of 4.1 I then batch sparged as normal.  I did have some issues sparging towards the end, but nothing too crazy.  Boiled for 90 minutes and added in 20g of Kosher Salt and a small amount of Coriander with 5 minutes to go in the boil.  At flame out I added 50g of Hibiscus and a few grams of Blood Orange zest for kicks, though I doubt any of the orange comes out in this beer.  After fermenting for a few days it crapped out on me around 1.020, I could have under pitched a bit, but still the gravity wasn’t that high.  I then added more yeast (S-05) but still nothing.  So after a week I decided to just go for it.  I threw in a good healthy dose of bottle dregs from Crooked Stave.  It was mainly dregs from Surette, Vielle, Hop Savant and St. Bretta.  Along with the dregs I added in about 50g more of Hibiscus for good measure.  I guess I will have to patiently wait to see how this one turns out.  Ill have to check back in a few months.

Photo 738 Photo 737

On to the recipe:

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
6 gal 90 min 8.8 IBUs 5.0 SRM 1.053 SG 1.011 SG 5.5 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
Specialty Beer 23 A 1.03 - 1.11 1.006 - 1.024 5 - 70 5 - 50 1.8 - 3 2.5 - 12 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Wheat - White Malt (Briess) 5.5 lbs 44
Acidulated (Weyermann) 3 lbs 24
Munich Malt 2 lbs 16
Pilsner (Weyermann) 2 lbs 16

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Hallertauer Mittelfrueh 0.6 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 4

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Calcium Chloride 8.00 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) 2.00 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 2.00 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Lactic Acid 2.00 ml 60 min Mash Water Agent
Calcium Chloride 6.50 g 60 min Boil Water Agent
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) 1.60 g 60 min Boil Water Agent
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 1.60 g 60 min Boil Water Agent
Servomyces 1.00 Items 10 min Boil Other
Coriander Seed 2.00 g 5 min Boil Spice
Salt 20.00 g 5 min Boil Water Agent
Hibisus 50.00 g 0 min Boil Herb
Hibisus 10.00 oz 5 days Secondary Herb

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
German Ale/Kolsch (WLP029) White Labs 75% 65°F - 69°F

Notes

Conduct First Mash traditionally for conversion then add Acidulated Malt and perform second mash for 30 minutes or until pH drops to 3.75-3.8, sparge and boil

Mill the grains, but be sure to keep the acidulated malt separate. Do not mill the rice hulls. Dough in all but the acidulated malt using 4.0 gallons (15 L) of water with a target mash holding temperature of 149 °F (65 °C). Hold the mash temperature for approximately 60 minutes or until the conversion is complete. Add the acidulated malt to the mash for an additional 45 minutes. Try to keep the temperature as close to original mash temperature as possible using an available heat source. Anything between 144–149 °F (62–65 °C) will work. Raise the temperature of the mash to 168 °F (76 °C) and begin sparging with 170 °F (77 °C) water until you collect 6.0 gallons (23 L) of wort in the kettle.

Added zest from 3 Blood Oranges at Flame Out

Back Again

So I’ve been a few years without posting anything.  I switched over to using WordPress from Blogger a few months back and am going to try to keep things up this go around.  Lots of beers have been brewed since August 31st 2012 and I will not rehash those.  I also tied this into Google+ to see how that works, so technically anything I post here should post there and vice versa.  I will hopefully be posting up some recent recipes soon.

JK RU55 Blend 3. Happy Birthday to me.

JK RU55 Blend 3. Happy Birthday to me.

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Spent the morning at Barbers. I have a thing for cafe racers and British bikes.

Spent the morning at Barbers. I have a thing for cafe racers and British bikes.